Concert Infographic: 50 Years Of Touring By The Rolling Stones

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Continuing our infographic exploration, here’s a cool collection of infographics via  Fast Company Design inspired by 50 Years of Touring by the Rolling Stones. This is the design from the 1994 tour, click here to see the entire collection.

Have you seen The Rolling Stones live? Drop us a comment below and let us know how this infographic brings back memories and we’ll share your story on a future episode of Live Fix Radio.

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Infographic: How Have Smartphones Changed The Festival Experience?

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This is a very interesting infographic via the Hypebot about the historic evolution of the smartphone and its impact on the music experience since Woodstock.

There’s some good data points in here. But what this infographic really reminds of is our chat with Alex from StagePage about mobile apps and how we need to foster more context and meaning around all the media that concert fans create during shows. I’d like to see an infographic that illustrates that conversation.

What do you think? Let us know in the comments below and we’ll share your story on a future episode of Live Fix Radio.

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Will High Gas Prices Drain Your Live Music Budget This Summer?

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As we’ve explored before the road trip is a big part of the live concert experience. And with the spike in gas prices we’re wondering if the recent hike in fueling your car will impact how many shows you go to this summer.

Exhibit A in our experiment is a cool infographic below via wepay.com. It highlights some last year’s overal costs of what fans spent to attend a summer music festival in 2011. Notice the full dollar increase in gas price since last year.

Exhibit B is this Billboard article that sites a recent study about gas prices influencing fan spending during this summer’s festival season.

The two researchers found overall spending on recreation experienced “no significant decline” due to gas price spikes. Some categories, such as sightseeing, recreational sports and spectator amusements, suffered “only insignificant declines,” while gas spikes showed “no significant effect” on activities such as movies, bowling and casino gambling. The researchers did not break out a category for music concerts.

Well, since live music wasn’t in their study, let’s do our own study right here on Live Fix.

Are You Re-thinking Your Concert Budget?

Will the higher gas prices force you to go to less concerts, more local shows, or hold off on traveling to your favorite festivals this summer? Or will the gas prices not make any impact on your concert adventures and live music spendatures at all? Will online and virtual concerts be the alternative and more popular?

Let us know and drop a comment below and we’ll share your story on a future episode of Live Fix Radio.
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Remembering The Beatles, Ballparks and Rosenblatt The Concert Venue

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The baseball season is almost underway and we’d like to celebrate by sharing this slick infographic that shows how closely related baseball is to live music and how The Beatles used ballparks to make their rounds in the U.S. in the 60’s.

As a Cubs fan, I will point out a couple things that struck me. It’s quite insightful to note how the impact of the Beatles on the teams in whose ballpark they played.

For example, it was interesting to see that when the Sox were one of only three team that lost their next home game after the Beatles played at Comiskey.  And the Cubs won their game against the hometown Giants in 1966. Hmmmm…?

Remembering Rosenblatt: Concert Venue

The other thing I’d like to add to this baseball park exploration is a cool story I discovered while chatting with a fellow concert fan Paul in Dallas.

During our chat Paul told me about his excellent website Remembering Roseblatt and how the venue was a popular spot for touring bands back in the 70’s and 80’s.  I loved reading Paul’s account of his first memories of seeing the Beach Boys and The Police, and here’s a snippet from his Remembering Rosenblattpost about beach balls and port-a-poties:

The Beach Boys
Finally, my shot came one summer in the early 80s. The Beach Boys were coming to Rosenblatt and my brother, nine years my senior, offered to take me along with his friends. I would have been twelve or thirteen at the time. I remember many things about that first concert experience and few of them had to do with the music. In particular, this was my first exposure to people openly consuming large amounts of alcohol and it was my first time ever smelling marijuana. I remember thinking how all of it made people just a little bit crazy.

For big concerts like this that weren’t affiliated with a baseball game, they would set the stage up on the warning track along the wall in right-centerfield. Concert goers would spread blankets out all over the outfield turf and party it up for an hour or two in anticipation of the show starting.

I’m not sure who thinks to bring beach balls to Rosenblatt events, but it seems there were always plenty on hand even back in the 80s. Waiting for your turn to volley the rainbow colored sphere is a great way to keep your mind off the anticipation of the opening number…

So thinking of Paul’s story, the impact of the Beatles on ballparks and the history of another shuttered sports stadium/concert venue, I’d like to know what the impact has been or will be of Dave Matthews, Roger Waters, Paul McCartney and the other bands that have played Wrigley in the past couple of years.

How are other concert fans experiencing live music at other historic ballparks? Have the Cubs (or other teams) won or lost more after these artists have played there?

While you’re thinking about the answer to those questions, check out our Live Fix Radio episode that highlights the Beatles Chicago tour stop in 1965.

Special thanks to Paul for sharing his story and to Flipflopflying.com for the rad infographic.

 

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What Does Van Halen’s Tour Rider Look Like in 2012?

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As we mentioned earlier Van Halen might be nervous about their current tour, and below is a infographic via Sonos documenting their infamous 1982 tour rider in all it’s glory. And here’s the 2008 rider via the Smoking Gun. Both of which are great fodder for our tour rider exploration.

But what about the VH rider for their 2012 tour?  Anybody have it to share with the rest of the class?

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The U2 Live Experiment Continues: 360 Tour Infographic and The Claw’s Backstory

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u2 360 tour infographic

Over the last couple of years we’ve been exploring the granduer of seeing U2 live in concert and I recently came across some excellent info that I wanted to pass along.

As you can see my the image above, the first is a detailed and eye-popping infographic which was created by the concert fans over at apple.copydesk.org and illustrates the award-winning and record-setting 360 tour. The image is packed with details about the show and the band.

What I love about this infographic is that it does a fantastic job of telling the micro-story behind why fans get so immersed on all levels and what makes a u2 concert so emotionally and visually stimulating, and ultimately unforgettable.  If you were at the shows, we’d love to hear what you think of the infographic and what you would add to it.

The second nugget we have to share with you is more fodder for our ongoing exploration of the Claw stage that was awe-inducing centerpiece to 360 tour. The stage was desinged by Enerpac and below is a section from the company’s website as they explain how the Claw stage was constructed with speed in mind.

We’re excited to share more about the claw so stay tuned as we connect with folks from Enerpac and have them as a guest on Live Fix Radio to talk about the stage and the U2 tour. If you have any questions you’d like answered during the show, go ahead and post them in the comments below.

One of the construction requirements was that the stage could be built and taken down again in a relatively short time. The challenge for Stageco was therefore how to assemble and dismantle the massive 230 ton construction each time. Logistics naturally also needed to be considered and a solution had to be found for the installation of the technics (light and sound) and the special 60 ton video screen that also had to be raised and lowered each time. Chain hoists and winches are normally used for stages, with the support of relatively light mobile cranes where required. However, the load in this project was so great that a different solution was called for. One of the alternatives considered was the use of extremely heavy mobile cranes with a lifting capacity of at least 400 to 500 tons. However, there was doubt as to whether such cranes would fit inside the stadiums where the concerts were due to take place and whether they could be stabilised sufficiently.

 

 

 

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Making Sense of SeatGeek’s Concert Density Report

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As we mentioned on recent episode of Live Fix Radio, Billboard shared an interesting infographic and report from SeatGeek, a secondary ticket startup who’s measured concert density among other things.

Now, at first this report is a bit misleading because we don’t normally look at concertgoing or our live entertainment options in this way.

For example, Illinois and Texas, home to Chicago and Austin, towns often noted as the most popular cities for live music aren’t represented as high density in the graphic. And it’s sad to see that no concert are happening in Alaska this summer.

But then as you take a closer look at the SeatGeek report, their take on the secondary ticket market and venues options per captia begins to sort of make sense.

And as Billboard points out in their article and infographic above, “the ratings also suggest that not all of consumers’ live music entertainment is enjoyed in or around their hometown.”

What do you think?

Are you from the states listed in the high density areas? Is this true to your concertgoing experiences?

 

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