Beyonce’s Big Game Gig Originality Issues and Real Concert Crowdsourcing

beyonce press conference super bowl halftime show

 

Okay, after yesterday’s press conference we now know that Beyonce can belt out the National Anthem acapella, which if you’re wondering, is one of the hardest songs to sing.

Hey, at least Beyonce didn’t try to lipsync over Whitney Houston‘s legendary verson of the National Anthem during the inauguration, or do something like Christina Aguilera did.

 

 

Will Beyonce’s Halftime Show Be Truly Original?

But as we get ready for her halftime show, I’m wondering about our previous exploration that questioned Beyonce’s live show originality.

In that originality exploration we took a deeper look at similarities between an artist being inspired or being a copycat.

It’s a controversial and provocative topic that influences almost all of our live music experiences and challenges us to really think about our favorite concert moments and why (and how) those moments move us, even when the artist isn’t being that original.

And I couldn’t help but think about Beyonce’s Billboard Awards story in the wake of the lip-syncing fiasco. Maybe this story will resurface after Sunday?

Maybe Beyonce will “borrow” from past shows to inspire Sunday’s show performance and set design? We’ll have to wait and see.

And as I watch our son Calvin develop, I’ve also thought about how Beyonce’s performance will be inspired by her daughter Blue Ivy?

What will be going through Blue Ivy’s mind and heart as she watches her mom entertain millions of people for 12 minutes?

Will Beyonce be teaching her daughter to rock out like this?

Is Pepsi Really Crowdsourcing the Super Bowl?

The other thing I was thinking about was the crowdsourcing element to this year’s half time show as Pepsi invites fans to submit photos to be included in the introduction of the Beyonce performance.

Of course, it’s not going to be anything close to our interactive Google Plus idea we suggested last year, but at least what Pepsi is doing is semi-social and sort-of interactive.

And according to ClickZ, the fans who win the Pepsi contest will get a chance to soak in the show on one of live music’s biggest stages:

The grand prize includes round-trip airfare, hotel accommodations, ground transportation, and $500 cash. Grand prize winners and their guests must participate in the Super Bowl halftime show practice in order to be present on the field during the halftime show. The prize does not include tickets to the Super Bowl XLVII game and Pepsi says winners will not have access to view the live game.

In order to promote the campaign, @Pepsi, which has 1.1 million followers, is tweeting with the hashtag #PepsiHalftime. Pepsi is also using promoted tweets and pulling in tweets with #PepsiHalftime and #LiveforNow on Pepsi.com.

 

 What Is Real Concert Crowdsourcing?

But, again, is what Pepsi is doing really crowdsourcing? And does this really benefit the fans or the evolve the live music experience? What is real concert crowdsourcing? How can crowdsourcing be used to tell amazing, diverse and unique fan stories like these?

We won’t answer those questions now, but in the meantime you can check out these great examples of concert crowdsourcing and tell me if you think Pepsi should have done something like this.

We hope you enjoy the Big Game and the halftime festivites and we look forward to sharing our experiences on the next episode of Live Fix Radio!

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